Cone Denim Celebrates 125 Years

Cone Denim

 

Cone Denim Celebrates 125 Years Of Denim Ingenuity

Cone Denim celebrates 125 Years of denim ingenuity last week with a two-day celebration (events on April 5 and 6)  in its hometown of Greensboro, N.C.

“This is a tremendous milestone for Cone Denim and the overall heritage of American denim, says Ken Kunberger, President & CEO of International Textile Group and Cone Denim. We are so appreciative of the support and enthusiasm for Cone Denim and look forward to another century of denim leadership.”

The history of Cone Denim dates back 125 years when two brothers, Moses and Ceasar Cone, born to Bavarian immigrants, first set into motion their vision of a marketing-based textile company. The Cones purchased more than 2000 acres in Greensboro and built the first plant, Proximity, named for its close “proximity” to the cotton fields which supplied its denims. The Revolution mill was built in 1899 expanding the company’s offerings with new flannel styles. At the turn of the century the brothers embarked on what would become the largest denim plant in the world, and White Oak began operations in April 1905.

White Oak’s heritage of authenticity and innovation continue to inspire today with its re-creation of vintage selvage denim, fashioned after the constructions of the early 1900s and woven today on American Draper X-3 fly shuttle looms. Early innovations included the development of long chain indigo dyeing, denim sanforization, and Cone’s Deeptone Denim, introduced in 1936. The White Oak mill operates today as Cone Denim’s global flagship operation, serving as the creative center for new product development and innovation led by Cone® 3D, the brand’s R&D group.

Cone Denim redefines contemporary denims with new sustainable and performance characteristics including its evolving line of performance denims offering patented S-Gene® stretch, high-performance strength, moisture management and cooling properties, and blends and treatments not traditionally available in denim.

Cone Denim practices sustainable manufacturing across its global network of mills focused on energy and water conservation, alternative fuels, recycling and sustainable cotton initiatives.

“There are so many people that have contributed to their success and establishing the Cone Denim brand as the hallmark of American denim ingenuity from their founders to a century of talented employees and supportive community to their dedicated supply partners and passionate customers”, says Salomón Juan Marcos Villarreal, president of Grupo Denim.

What is the Index?

Index

 

What is the Index in Mexico?

Index is a private body dedicated to represent the interests and needs of maquiladoras and manufacturer exporting companies in Mexico.

“Organisms like Index are a very important tool for manufacturing enterprises in Mexico, as we are always trying to get consultancies in order to export products abroad in an easy manner and it is great to have an institution like Index to help us doing this”, said Salomon Juan Marcos Villarreal, president of Grupo Denim, a manufacturing company in Mexico.

Index represents an 80% total of the labor force of the exporting industry, which is more than 2,250,000 workers in total, who are employed in more than 1,200 exporting enterprises in more than 20 different cities in Mexico.

This shows the importance of the manufacturer industry and exporting companies for Mexico’s economy, as these enterprises create many new job sources for Mexicans, generating profits and attracting new foreign direct invest, but there are some other factors to consider maquiladoras’ industry as one of the most important for the country: it promotes the exporting Mexican industry, create development opportunities with responsibility and integrity, and collaborates with the authorities to have exportations in rule as well as promotes the employee training.

The Index national representation is supported by the local and regional representation through maquiladoras and manufacturing companies, answering to the constant modifications about the Mexican laws at its different levels, by solving any legal uncertainty for enterprises in this sector, which helps them saving operation costs.

“Index has developed their function by working hard to make sure the manufacturing and exporting companies know the regulation in productive and administrative aspects and to advise if they are complying correctly with their obligations with the Mexican government, which is of great help for enterprises like Grupo Denim to have an organization like this in Mexico that comes with information and solutions of the different topics that we are concerned about”, added Salomon Juan Marcos Villarreal.

For more information, please visit http://mexican-denim.com

Improved manufacturing quality

Improved manufacturing quality

Five Steps to Improved Manufacturing Quality

Good managers seek to contain costs in the manufacturing environment. There is no better cost to eliminate than the cost of poor quality. Scrap material and lost labor hours add no value to the operation.

  1. Use a Team Mindset

Quality won’t be sustainably improved by individuals. To really make lasting and meaningful change in manufacturing processes, it will take a team based approach.

  1. Define Quality from the Customer Perspective

Too often, staff within a manufacturing environment want to make a product “better” but don’t really know what better means. With additional cost, we almost always can make a product better.

  1. Develop Organizational Understanding of the Cost of Quality

The cost to fix a defect in the field once it reaches a customer is dramatically higher than the cost to fix the source of the problem before it is created. It is essential that the manufacturing staff be trained to understand the cost multipliers involved with warranty repair or replacement and cost of damaged reputation. Once the staff take this perspective, a desire to find root cause for problem solving is inherently developed.

  1. Solve Problems Completely

All too often, manufacturing quality improvements fix the symptoms of failure rather than the root cause. This can be done by adding quality inspection steps or rework stations that make it more efficient to fix defects.

  1. Employ Strong Process Discipline

Throughout the quality improvement process, it is essential that strong process discipline is employed. Depending on the product that is being manufactured, deviation without proper team cooperation and anticipation of the change could have dire quality repercussions.

In order to best eliminate these wastes, a strategic approach to quality improvement is essential. By following these five steps, quality can be improved in a meaningful, sustainable way commentedSalomón Juan Marcos Villarreal, president of Grupo Denim.

For more information of Manufacturing Quality, please visit us at http://mexican-denim.com

Direct Manufacturing Labor Costs

manufacturing labor cost

Direct manufacturing labor costs and how to calculate them

Manufacturing labor costs represents the total cost of workers needed to manufacture final goods. This is a great business solution because it helps to understand how much of the cost is going to be needed to pay the laborers that produced the final products. This cost is calculated by computing the direct employees and their salaries. It is very important to be able to identify direct labor costs from indirect labors costs.

1.- Identify Direct Workers: These are the employees who actually make the work on the manufacturing process, for example in an apparel company, the operator that sew the garments is a direct worker but the person that does the cleaning is not.

2.- Adding Operation: Need to add up the total hours from a specific period of all the direct workers. For example 5 employees that worked 300 hours each, would total 1,500 hours.

3.- Multiply Operation: In order to get the total direct manufacturing costs, we need to multiply the total hours by the rate of the labor. For example, let’s say that the rate is $9 pesos per hour, then 1,500 hours X 9 = 13,500 which means that the direct costs are $13,500 pesos.

Salomon Juan Marcos Villarreal,  president of Grupo Denim a famous maquiladora located in Gomez Palacio, Durango, México, explained that all accounting center costs are much needed to run a successful business and that even a small companies need to have their own accounting solutions. “Direct and indirect labor costs are significantly important because they help to measure the business by defining the cost; in our case, of the garments sold. When we analyze both costs when talking about profits, the accurate information from both costs defines how the production rates and profits are moving and then we can control them”, said Salomon Juan Marcos Villarreal.

Inherent versus Treated Flame Resistant Fabrics

Flame Resistant

The differences between “inherent” and “treated” flame resistant fabrics

Inherently flame resistant fibers are materials that have flame resistance built into their chemical structures.

The actual structure of the fiber itself is not flammable. For inherently flame resistant fibers, the protection is built into the fiber itself and can never be worn away or washed out. When exposed to flame, the aramid fiber swells and becomes thicker, forming a protective barrier between the heat source and the skin. This protective barrier stays supple until it cools, giving the wearer vital extra seconds of protection to escape.

The other main category is flame-retardant treated (FRT) fabrics. These materials are made he flame-resistant (FR) properties of inherently flame resistant fabrics, on the other hand, cannot be washed out or worn away, period. This means the flame-resistant properties of garments made of inherent fibers cannot be compromised. It is crucial for the wearer to know the flame-resistant protection is always there.

Laundering’s impact on flame resistance

An essential thing to keep in mind when assessing flame-resistant technologies is that inherent flame resistant properties cannot be washed out or damaged through exposure to chemicals in the workplace or laundering practices, whether at-home or commercial. FR-treated garments, however, may be damaged by chlorine bleach, the combination of hydrogen peroxide (“oxygen bleach”) with hard water, or exposure to oxidizing chemicals in the workplace.flame-resistant by the application of flame-retardant chemicals. A chemical additive in the fiber or treatment on the fabric is used to provide some level of flame retardancy. During a fire, chemically dependent fabrics rely on a chemical reaction to extinguish the flame. This reaction is triggered by the heat of the fire and the amount of time the fabric is exposed to the fire.

It is very difficult to determine whether protection has been compromised with an FRT fabric.

There are ways to test it. Unfortunately, all of these test methods are destructive  there really is no way to test a garment to determine what its current level of flame resistance or arc protection value is, without destroying the garment in a flame or arc flash test.

Grupo Denim is including Flame Resistant Fabric Treatments on special garments for multiples customers that are requiring it said Salomon Juan Marcos Villarreal, president of this company

Responsible Sourcing

responsible sourcing

Responsible Sourcing, a great initiative from VF Corporation

VF Corporation is running a new program called “Responsible Sourcing” which is an initiative that ensures that their contractor suppliers are operating with the same high standards that they set for their own factory plants. The objectives of the program are to:

• Maintain safe and healthy environments for all workers.
• Manufacture products and source raw materials responsibly and ethically.
• Reduce the environment impact of our business.
• Improve the standard of living for all workers who make our products.

Founded in 1899 as the Reading Glove and Mitten Manufacturing Company, VF has been manufacturing textiles for more than 115 years. Today, VF owns and operates 30 manufacturing facilities and sources from more than 2,000 contractor factories around the world. By enhancing supply chain collaboration, they will drive improved practices benefiting workers, factory performance, the environment, the communities where they operate, and the consumers who buy their products. There are four key elements to VF’s Responsible Sourcing program:

1. Putting worker’s well-being first: Ensuring worker’s lives are protected through critical life safety and compliance support.
2. Raw material traceability and stewardship: Building material-flow transparency to ensure ethical raw material sourcing practices.
3. Environmental and social sustainability: Positively impacting people and the planet with a measurement-based approach to guide decisions.
4. Sustainable living environments: Providing access to health, nutrition and clean water services to enrich worker’s lives.

VF’s history as a leader in manufacturing and sourcing is storied. The Responsible Sourcing program begins another chapter that leads them, together with their sourcing partners, into a more sustainable future.
Grupo Denim is manufacturing company located in Mexico and also a VF sourcing partner since decades which is already working on fulfilling all the objectives of this program. “I think this program is a great new motor on the manufacturing business, Peter Higgins, Director of Sustainable Operations has already been in our plant and we are really looking forward to operate and improve any standard already in place”, said Salomon Juan Marcos Villarreal, president of Grupo Denim.